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Articles in the Race Relations Category

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[4 Feb 2014 | No Comment | ]

This is pretty interesting, if you’ve got the time. East Cleveland is sort of a spectacular example of everything that’s gone wrong in the Cleveland area.
One interesting thing about this video is that the people from East Cleveland seem to blame the city’s people for its downfall. I don’t at all. I think this is what happens when you have absolutely no housing policy and building new communities means throwing away the “old” ones. A few people got rich building new suburbs in northeast Ohio over the last few decades …

Headline, Race Relations »

[26 Aug 2013 | No Comment | ]
Cleveland’s African American Museum–A Hidden Gem

Tucked into a corner of the east side of Cleveland—unbeknownst to many in Northeastern Ohio and even in the city itself— is one of the region’s great cultural treasures. In operation since 1953, the African American Museum of Cleveland was the first independent museum in the country dedicated to chronicling the Black American and African experience.
The museum was the brainchild of Icabod Flewellen. Born in 1916 in West Virginia, Flewellen began obsessively collecting items relating to black history at a young age. …

Architecture, Crime, Economic Development, Featured, Great Lakes, Politics, Public Transportation, Race Relations, Real Estate, Sports, Sprawl, The Media, U.S. Auto Industry, Urban Planning, Urban Poverty »

[5 Aug 2013 | No Comment | ]
Shared Responsibility for Detroit’s Woes

As a Michigander for the past 21 years, I’ve heard my share of Detroit criticisms, jokes, and put downs, both from within and outside the Great Lakes State. While fingers can be  pointed at the lack of past civic and political leadership in Detroit, our collective actions (or lack thereof) can certainly share in the responsibility. Some may scoff at such a notion, but here’re a few reasons why:

As a nation we elected leaders who adopted a tax code and laws that advocated, promoted, and accelerated flight from cities and …

Featured, Headline, Race Relations »

[17 Jul 2013 | No Comment | ]
4 Steps to Become an Ally of an Inner City Black Neighborhood (or anything, really)

So you are aware that having racially-segregated, poor communities in our post-industrial cities is a bad idea. And you want to do something about it!Hough. Photo by Anna Arnold http://annaarnoldsuniverse.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-street-museum-public-murals-of-anna.html

The good news is that you don’t have to be white or a resident to be an ally of an inner black neighborhood. You can of any ethnicity, religion, culture or nation and still support the improvement of this community.

What is an ally?

Being an ally means you are not part of an oppressed/minority/marginalized community, but you are conscious of their situation and support efforts to make it better.

Book Review, Brain Drain, Economic Development, Featured, Great Lakes, Headline, Labor, Politics, Race Relations, The Environment, U.S. Auto Industry, Urban Planning, Urban Poverty »

[3 Jun 2013 | No Comment | ]
A literary triumph – “Nothing But Blue Skies” by Edward McClelland

It is difficult to describe how truly outstanding the book entitled Nothing But Blue Skies: The Heyday, Hard Times, and Hopes of America’s Industrial Heartland is to read. As a nearly lifelong Rust Belt resident, I can attest to the fact that Edward McClelland’s newly released book simply nails our industrial heritage, decline, and hopeful potential squarely on the head. From nationally known politicians like Dennis Kucinich or Coleman Young to the everyday blue-collar laborer toiling in our mills and factories, Mr. McClelland personifies the Rust Belt like no other book I have ever read on the subject. As a Lansing native, he has personally witnessed the dramatic (and sometimes catastrophic) changes just in his lifetime. In Nothing But Blue Skies, Mr. McClelland takes the reader on a quasi-chronological step-by-step sequence of events that shook the Rust Belt down it its very core.

Crime, Race Relations, Urban Poverty »

[26 Feb 2013 | No Comment | ]

Late last year, at the culmination of a long high-speed chase, 13 Cleveland police fired 137 rounds into a car in East Cleveland killing two unarmed people.
State and local authorities are currently investigating the case: why the chase — which violates official department policies — occurred; why police thought the fleeing couple was armed.
The case has raised charges of brutality and discrimination within the police department. None of the 13 shooters was black, but the victims were.
Anyway, one of the more upsetting elements of this case is that the shooting …

Featured, Race Relations, Real Estate »

[1 Feb 2013 | One Comment | ]
“A Place Worth Living”: Defending a Deeply Stigmatized Neighborhood

The worst part about living in Hough is that you can’t talk about living in Hough.

Not unless you want to experience Horrible Things from your friends, family and colleagues. There are three types of Horrible Things: 1) The LOOK, 2) The pat on the back, and 3) The argument.

Horrible Thing 1: the LOOK:
Several of my high school friends went out to dinner, the ladies who have been there through the highs and lows, from the hilariously awkward middle school dances through baby showers and funerals. One friend was looking to buy a house and I chimed in, “Oh yeah, the neighborhood is everything.”

Featured, Race Relations, Real Estate »

[4 Jan 2013 | No Comment | ]
Youngstown is NOT (Really) Gentrifying–at Least Not in the Normal Sense

My friend, Youngstown celebrity Phil Kidd, told me a hahafunny recently. After consistently being ranked as one of the poorest cities in the country, Youngstown has recently seen a small reversal of fortunes in its downtown. A handful of new bars, some housing development, and viola — old-school Youngstowners are now complaining about “gentrification.”

I have a message for these people: Stop it!

Race Relations »

[25 Oct 2012 | One Comment | ]

If you’ve got some time to kill, check out this vintage video about how racial change impacted Cleveland’s Buckeye neighborhood. Sad and unfortunate, but this history is still impacting the city in a big way.
One of the biggest take aways for me, and my friend Charlotte, whose father is a Hungarian immigrant who grew up in this neighborhood, is the packed sidewalks in Buckeye Road. Sheesh. It looks like Madison Avenue in New York. What a contrast with today!
Another thing, I apologize some of the wording in this video is …

Editorial, Race Relations »

[15 Aug 2012 | No Comment | ]

People often accuse me of being angry or negative. It’s a pretty highly charged accusation and I have to admit that sometimes it stings; but more and more I’m used to it.
I’ve thought it over a little bit, you see, and I don’t really have an anger problem in my personal life. Not in my family. Not in my relationship with my boyfriend. Not at my job. But, oh my gosh, a land use issue in Cleveland can really set me off. It raises my blood pressure. I had to …