Real Estate »

[18 Feb 2009 | One Comment | ]

Forbes Magazine called Las Vegas America’s emptiest city, edging out No. 2 Detroit. The rating was based on volume of abandoned homes. Rental vacancy is 16.9 percent in Las Vegas and home vacancy is 4.7 percent. In Detroit, vacancy rates are 19.9 percent for rentals and 4 percent for homes.
Also on the list: Charlotte; Bakersfield, Ca.; Miami, Orlando, Phoenix, Dayton, Cincinnati, Atlanta.
http://www.forbes.com/2009/02/12/cities-ten-top-lifestyle-real-estate_0212_cities_slide_17.html?thisSpeed=15000

Real Estate »

[18 Feb 2009 | No Comment | ]

Forbes Magazine called Las Vegas America’s emptiest city, edging out No. 2 Detroit. The rating was based on volume of abandoned homes. Rental vacancy is 16.9 percent in Las Vegas and home vacancy is 4.7 percent. In Detroit, vacancy rates are 19.9 percent for rentals and 4 percent for homes.
Also on the list: Charlotte; Bakersfield, Ca.; Miami, Orlando, Phoenix, Dayton, Cincinnati, Atlanta.
http://www.forbes.com/2009/02/12/cities-ten-top-lifestyle-real-estate_0212_cities_slide_17.html?thisSpeed=15000

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[18 Feb 2009 | One Comment | ]

No joke. NPR reporter Dan Bobkoff visited Youngstown to do a story about its thriving business incubator, which now employs about 300 in downtown. Here’s what he had to say:
“Youngstown has been down so long it’s become shorthand for the Rust Belt,” he said. “When I heard that a block of Youngstown is starting to look like a tiny Silicon Valley, I drove down there to check it out.”
Software start-ups at this “managed business cluster” get free rent and utilities courtesy of the state — and the investment appears to …

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[17 Feb 2009 | No Comment | ]

It may be down, but don’t count manufacturing out.
The Associated Press reports the U.S. still leads the world in manufacturing, in terms of the value of goods sold. In 2007, the U.S. produced a record $1.6 trillion in manufactured goods — mainly heavy manufacturing such as aircrafts, weapons, cars and other vehicles.
Lighter manufacturing is being shifted to cheaper production markets overseas.
However, about 8 percent of the U.S. workforce is still employed in manufacturing. Economists expect U.S. manufacturers to emerge from this recession more productive and efficient, The AP reports.
http://www.buffalonews.com/145/story/581639.html

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[17 Feb 2009 | No Comment | ]

The New York Times writes that white-collar jobs are evaporating in Detroit nearly as fast as blue-collar. The bad news for designers, engineers and mid-level executives is that the housing market is defunct.
Upper-middle-class, suburban families are living on unemployment and weighing the merits of selling their houses at 60 percent of their purchase price, The Times reports. With each round of buyouts and layoffs, foreclosure rates are climbing.
“I know it’s not great everywhere, but this is probably the worst place to find a job,” said Doug Zupan, a designer who …