“Anthropological Signposts”: The Fences of Pittsburgh

Brilliant, Pittsburgh-based photographer Laura Ainsley, co-founder of American Elegy, has been exploring Pittsburgh’s dividing lines as a case study in social change.

Lawrenceville

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Here’s what she had to say about the project:

When Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods once throbbed with the heartbeat of industry, members of the
working class did their best to carve out small plots of life of their own.

 

Larimer

In neighborhoods around the city, families of these workers—many of whom were immigrants or the
descendants of recent immigrants—made their lives in these in these gardens, on these porch stoops,
and in the neighborhoods that grew up around them.

Polish Hill

However, as the economic landscape changed, so did the physical landscape. These neighborhoods
continue to demonstrate this change.

 

Lawrenceville

Among the physical elements that remain are the fences. Acting as anthropological signposts, fences
stand as evidence of the barriers of lives once lived—while helping to frame for us just where we are
now.

Homewood

 

Uptown

I think this is a fascinating look at Pittsburgh. We are online pharmacy thrilled that Laura agreed to share her photos with us.

-A.S.

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Filed under Featured, The Big Urban Photography Project

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