Tag Archives: Dayton

Dayton Patented. Originals Wanted.

Can “branding” a city through a snappy slogan and slick marketing campaign work?

A lot of cities apparently think so, including Dayton and Cleveland, as outlined in this USA Today story.

They point to successful and memorable slogans, like “I love New York,” and “What Happens in Vegas, Stays in Vegas.” It’s also interesting to read the comments under the story- on mentions great success North Dakota has had marketing itself as a “Wild West” destination for bicyclists.

The story doesn’t mention less-successful campaigns. (I’m thinking of the Michael Moore movie Roger & Me, when he mocks the marketing campaign Flint undertakes: “Flint: Our New Spark Will Surprise You.”) It does detail the Hastily Made Cleveland Tourism video, which Rust Wire previously highlighted.

I’m not sure how much a slogan alone can do without the jobs and attractions to back it up…but I guess a good one can’t hurt.

Have any other Rust Belt cities tried branding like this? Have they had any success?

-KG

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Filed under Brain Drain, Economic Development, Good Ideas, regionalism

Ohio’s 3C Rail Plan gets $400M Boost

The Columbus Dispatch is reporting that the Obama administration has earmarked $400 million for Ohio’s plan to link Columbus, Cincinnati, Dayton and Cleveland via high-speed rail.

From The Dispatch:

Ohio officials are banking on federal stimulus money for most or all of the estimated $517.6 million they say they need to improve existing freight rail to passenger standards and to buy trains.

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“This is some of the best news we have had in a long time,” Senator Sherrod Brown said. “If I put my ear down to the rail I think I hear a train coming.”

This is good news for people who are from Columbus but live in Cleveland (like me!) and their families. Hooray!

-AS

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Filed under Featured, Good Ideas, Green Jobs, Public Transportation, The Big Urban Photography Project, U.S. Auto Industry

From Auto Workers to…

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This past week, The New York Times highlighted Sinclair Community College, a school in Dayton helping to retrain workers for the “new” economy.

This glowing piece highlights the school’s low tuition, well-respected programs, aid for displaced G.M. and Delphi workers, and growing enrollment.

“We help people go from $8-an-hour jobs to $18-an-hour jobs,”the school’s president told The Times.

It’s also good to see a Dayton institution get good press after all the negative “dying cities” stuff.

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Filed under Economic Development, Education, Good Ideas, Public Education, U.S. Auto Industry

Take That, Forbes Lists

Rust Wire readers know this blog frequently rants about how Forbes magazine mischaracterizes our cities with its silly and bogus lists – America’s Downsized Cities, Hardest Places to Get By, Dying Cities, and even Best Place for Singles.

(Somehow, Cleveland is ranked as a “dying city,” and a “most miserable city,” yet it is also one of the best places for singles, according to the magazine. Go figure.)

Well, I’m glad to see the folks in Dayton, Ohio, are doing more than just ranting. Upset with their inclusion on the “Dying Cities” list, they organized a symposium to prove the list wrong, as this blog previously reported.

The event is this coming weekend, and as the Dayton Daily News reports, the author of this article will be in town “to face his critics.”

The story adds, “Joshua Zumbrun, a Washington correspondent for Forbes, said he has written many stories based on statistical data, but none has gleaned the level of response of “American’s Fastest Dying Cities” published Aug. 5, 2008.

“I didn’t realize how much a fire it would light,” Zumbrun said.”

In addition to Dayton, other stories on the list were Canton, Cleveland, and Youngstown, Ohio, Buffalo, N.Y.; Charleston, W.Va.; Detroit and Flint, Mich.; Scranton Pa.; and Springfield, Mass.

“It was never my intention to kick people while they were down,” said Zumbrun, noting that he hails from Fort Wayne, Ind., and that he has visited nine of the 10 cities on the list.

“I want to emphasize that there is good and bad in any economy, job gains, job losses,” he said.

Reaction to the article in Dayton began with anger and disappointment, then grew into a grassroots movement to challenge it,” the Dayton Daily News reports.

To register for the event, go to tenlivingcities.org

I’d love to know if any of our readers are going to the event, and if so to hear their impressions….

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Filed under Good Ideas, regionalism

Dayton Loses 1,250 Jobs, Only Remaining Fortune 500 Company

Boy, this is so depressing, I can hardly bring myself to write it. Dayton’s sole remaining Fortune 500 company, which has been headquartered in the city for 125 years, is moving operations to Atlanta.

NCR, a manufacturer of ATM machines and cash registers, will bring some 2,000 jobs to Atlanta. The company was offered $60 million in tax breaks by the state of Georgia, The Dayton Daily News reports. Ohio attempted a counter offer of $31 million, to which CEO Bill Nuti responded “It pales in comparison to what Georgia is giving.” He also thanked Dayton for all its years of support.

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This is all lifted from the DDN: The company was founded as the National Cash Register Co. in 1884. Founder John Patterson also started the Dayton Chamber of Commerce. At one time, NCR employed nearly 60,000 people in Ohio.

Boy, that is really going to sting.

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Filed under Economic Development, Featured

Fed Directs $50 Million to Auto Towns

The Federal Government will steer $50 million in assistance to communities with auto plants that have experienced significant layoffs, The Associated Press reports.

The money will come from federal stimulus funds and be used for job training and placement. Continue reading

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Filed under U.S. Auto Industry

Dayton to Host “Dying Cities” Symposium

Upset with being named to Forbes’ “10 Fastest Dying Cities” list, Daytonians are taking action, The Dayton Daily News reports.

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